Beyond Veteran's Day - Recognize Your Military and Veteran Employees All Year Long

Beyond Veteran's Day - Recognize Your Military and Veteran Employees All Year Long

As an Army veteran and a civilian CEO, I can tell you firsthand that there is a lot of available information about the importance of recognizing veterans in your organization, especially on Veterans Day. While that’s a good place to start, it shouldn’t be where you stop.

Maybe you have military employee resource groups in place. Great! Perhaps you have a veteran leadership mentoring program. Fantastic! But to go the “extra mile,” sometimes you need to put in a personal touch or think outside the box.

Use these best practices to demonstrate the appreciation and support your company has for the men and women of the military community, year-round:

1 | RECOGNIZE U.S. MILITARY BIRTHDAYS.

Learn the service branch of your veteran employees and recognize them on their respective military branch birthday.

For example, in an ideal world, I’d want to know who all the Marine veterans were in my charge. On November 10th, I would personally send them each an email saying, “Thank you for your service, thank you for being a Marine, and thank you for what you bring to the company.”

If you’re worried that this approach might mean you could miss someone, then send a company-wide email instead: “Happy U.S. Marine Corps birthday to all the devil dogs in the organization. Thanks for your service. I’d love to hear, personally, what the Marine Corps birthday means to you.”

2 | RECOGNIZE MILITARY SPOUSES.

Know who the military spouses are in your company and recognize them on Military Spouse Appreciation Day (the Friday before Mother’s Day.)

I think most veterans would understand when I say that acknowledging my wife's service as a is more meaningful to me than being honored for my own. Military spouses are the men and women who support our warfighters from home, and they deserve just as much appreciation.

Military Spouse Appreciation Day is a great time to show support on an individual basis to people. In this case, you’ll want to do something more than an email.

You could gift the recipient a small gift card and handwritten note, thanking them for their service and sacrifice as a military spouse.

If you don’t know who the military spouses are, find out! Build a spouse question into your onboarding paperwork. Then, have your human resources department keep a census of veterans, active servicemembers, and military spouses.

3 | RECOGNIZE DEPLOYED FAMILY MEMBERS.

Find out which of your employees have children serving overseas. Better yet, if their son or daughter is deployed to a combat zone, put a care package together from the company. Include a note that says, “Your mom [or dad] is an amazing teammate of ours. Thank you for what you’re doing to serve our country.”

Obviously, there are limitations to this suggestion, but if there is a way to do it, this is something that is really valuable to the recipient. If the challenge is that the organization is too large to keep track of everyone’s dependents, create a communication chain where your employees can let you know when one of their family members is deploying, whether that's a spouse or a child.

Encourage open communication so that the company can provide support and then be as flexible and generous as you can in the support you provide.

Tim Best is chief executive officer of Bradley-Morris & RecruitMilitary and a U.S. Army veteran.

This article originally appeared in Search & Employ magazine.

By Tim Best

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